IDDA Discussion Forum
August 19, 2022, 11:01:05 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: SMF - Just Installed!
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]
 11 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:43:19 PM 
Started by admin2 - Last post by admin2
Posts from previous forum:
=================================
Patrick W. Brenden (Homerun)
Username: Homerun
Posted on Saturday, May 27, 2006 - 10:36 am:      

I'm wondering what software is in use within our community to handle accounting, quotations, and shop floor control. We presently use Peachtree for Manufacturing for accounting and inventory issues - ACT for contact management and quotations. Looking to upgrade to something that would be more integrated from selling through manufacturing and accounting.
-----------------------------------------------
Andrew Host (Cdroms2)
Username: Cdroms2
Posted on Thursday, June 22, 2006 - 4:25 pm:
     
At CD-ROM Services in Sydney, Australia, we could not get by without our KIS PCS software for shop floor control, inventory and point of sale accounting. However, we're still using MYOB for our main accounting software.

 12 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:41:31 PM 
Started by admin2 - Last post by admin2
Posts from the previous forum:
======================================
Simon Reece (Dubshop)
Username: Dubshop
Posted on Tuesday, January 31, 2006 - 11:10 am:
      
Would love members comments to the letter we received from a client of ours. We supplied thermal white Verbatim discs printed with Everest printer.

The letter reads:
Please find with this letter 100 copies of Firestarters 2 that you burned for us last week. We are returning these because the product is not up to the standard we require.
We are unhappy that the 100 CDs have a blue backing as opposed to the normal silver that one would expect to find on a Compact Disc. At no point were we told that in order to have the thermal imaging on the face of the disc that these discs would be necessary. We are of the opinion that this blue backing cheapens the product and is therefore not usable for our purposes.
As we cannot use the items supplied we do not expect to be charged for them.

--------------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone
Posted on Saturday, February 11, 2006 - 5:45 am:
     
Simon, I would suggest putting the issue back into the customer's hands by suggesting that you will re-do all of the discs but they have to tell you which brand to use. As you know all major brands of discs have dye on the recording side - some blue, some green but they all do with the exception of "True silver" discs. We have some here which are very difficult to tell which side is the recordable side they are so silver. They are no-name CDs. Once your customer finds out that all burnable CDs have various coloured dyes they may change their tune. I suspect though that they made a mistake on the content and would like you to pay for their error (which I run into all the time). It does sound to me like they got what they ordered. Good luck.
--------------------------------------------------
Simon Reece (Dubshop)
Username: Dubshop
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 11:51 am:
      
The client has just closed the door on us! Wont discuss it and refuses to pay. Have said they got it done else where on silver.
Thanks for that anyway. Interesting the comment about incorrect content.
Cheers
Simon

--------------------------------------------------
Andrew Host (Cdroms2)
Username: Cdroms2
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 4:15 pm:
      
I'm yet to see a good quality "True Silver" disc. I'd love to be proved wrong. Anyone have BLER analysis that shows a good quality "True Silver" disc?
--------------------------------------------------
Ian Robertson (Solstice)
Username: Solstice
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2007 - 4:43 am:
     
Try ProDisc

 13 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:38:40 PM 
Started by admin2 - Last post by admin2
Post from previous forum:
=============================
Bernhard Kirschner (Cdroms)
Username: Cdroms
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 8:31 pm:
     
Memory Cards duplication

What is one future for disc duplicators?

Memory cards will be a way to market a product with same novelty marketing concept as shaped discs.

There are few customers who will not read or play data on SD or a memory card, before using the card themselves. Memory cards are rapidly dropping in price. Memory cards duplicators are available, and it is not too difficult to build your own SD card burners, much as we are familiar with disc duplicating racks. For more information on who is already offering this service contact info@discdupe.org.

Keep an eye on this trend.

-------------------------------------------------------
Susan Coon (Discinc)
Username: Discinc
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 4:17 am:
     
We're looking for info on systems to duplicate memory cards. The requests are growing. What solutions have you guys come up with? Thanks so much.
-------------------------------------------------------
Patrick W. Brenden (Homerun)
Username: Homerun
Posted on Tuesday, August 08, 2006 - 2:21 am: 
   
Check out a company called Int'l Microsystems Inc. based in Milpitas, CA. They offer units capable of anywhere from 4 to 36 copies at a time. Pricing starts around $3k USD. www.imi-test.com
-------------------------------------------------------
Patrick W. Brenden (Homerun)
Username: Homerun
Posted on Tuesday, August 08, 2006 - 2:23 am:   
   
What are you seeing out there as far as pricing for the various memory cards and flash drives? What is the most popular formats for novelty marketing use? Where should we look for sources of custom logo media?
-------------------------------------------------------
Ron Opryszek (Failsafe)
Username: Failsafe
Posted on Wednesday, October 04, 2006 - 11:57 pm:   
   
Failsafe Media offers SD, compact flash, USB duplication along with custom logo printing. Please contact
www.failsafeinc.com
1-800-537-1919 ext 115
Ron Opryszek

-------------------------------------------------------
David Morris (Cdroms_dm)
Username: Cdroms_dm
Posted on Wednesday, November 01, 2006 - 3:55 pm:      

X Card Duplicator

The X Card Duplication System is an inexpensive solution at only US$200

- The program has been written so you can set up your own custom built system for a fraction of the cost of other systems, other systems can set you back thousands

The program gives you the possibility of Duplicating 23 USB Sticks simultaneously
and up to 8 Memory Cards in any format, limited only by what your card reader can read/write

Task which can be performed include:
1. Format Card Only
2. Format Then Data Copy
3. Data Copy Only

For Inquiry on Sales
Please Contact Bernhard Kirschner:
info@discdupe.org

For Inquiry on Technical Info
Please contact David Morris:
david@cdroms.com.au

-------------------------------------------------------
Ian Robertson (Solstice)
Username: Solstice
Posted on Saturday, March 31, 2007 - 2:07 am:   
   
Solstice Technologies distributes a full range of memory card duplicators.

http://www.solstice-inc.com/Altec_memcard_duplicat ors.htm

 14 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:28:27 PM 
Started by Andrew Host - Last post by Andrew Host
Post from previous forum:
============================
Bernhard Kirschner (Cdroms)
Username: Cdroms
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 8:30 pm:
      
Discussion on labels on discs.

There is still no perfect method for disc decoration. More and more IDDA members are using labels on their discs, so is this a problem?

Inkjet printing, was originally slow, now faster, was subject to moisture damage, now more moisture resistant, was not cheap, now cheaper, with color inconsistency, now more consistent is improving in every way. However, past experiences have dampened duplicators enthusiasm for ink jet printing.

Thermal printing as per the Rimage Prism is great for black, both as to cost, reliability and speed, but rather inferior for color. Note that some discs brands do not fare well with some compatible Rimage ribbons. The Rimage Everest produces a great result, but is rather expensive and slow, similarly with the new TEAC colour printer.

If you are near a service that offers direct disc toner printing the results are excellent and the price reasonable for medium and long runs.

Screen printing gives a great result, but there are film and screen costs that make short runs uneconomical, plus there are few screen printers who can offer fast service.

Sticky labels are a low priced very attractive looking solution, when produced on a 6-up sheet on a large format laser printer. The Xerox 1250 is an excellent machine, and rebuilt machines are available from Xerox at relatively reasonable cost. Other copiers such as from Canon also give excellent results, but ensure that your supplier will not penalise you for running labels through their copier.

One advantage is the fixed cost per label, as Xerox offer a fixed “click” or meter charge irrespective of the amount of image covered. This click charge is about US$0.15c per color sheet, and 6 up A3 or 11”x17” sheets, cost about US$0.30 each. Each label now costs just US$0.06c each. Labels can be applied accurately by hand at the rate of about 100 to 200 per hour, giving a total cost of about $0.15c -$0.25c each.

The labels look as good, sometimes better than screen-prints. Using the correct label material there is no reason that the labels will come loose for many years. It is also unlikely that the label glue will reduce the storage life of the media much more than thermal or inkjet surface. Much of the negative comments on labels would come from the suppliers of competing technologies.

-------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 9:27 am:
     
We have a pretty reasonable disc printing method that avoids the use of labels. We have found quite a bit of resistance from users on labelled discs. In our area, we get very hot, humid summers and the humidity has a tendency to expand the paper stock and cause wrinkles.

We currently use the Microboards PrintFactory printers and we then coat the discs using the Verity Artcoater. It does an excellent job at about a fifth of the cost of the Primera laminators. Customers love the finish and durability and the cost is less than the Everest/Teac solutions. However, we are seriously considering purchasing an Everest so we can offer our customers a "premium" product. I feel that discs produced on the Everest would cost the end user 20 cents over the inkjet/coated process we currently use. We get reorders of projects all the time so colour inconsistancy is an issue.

There are a couple of negatives with the Artcoater - it requires an air compressor and outside venting. Other than that it performs very well and is well made and quite dependable. The consumable costs work out to approximately US 2cents per disc although the (automated) machines list for around 10K. With our two Artcoaters, we can produce well over 200 discs per hour. You would need about 5 or 6 Everests for similar output.

-------------------------------------------
Patrick W. Brenden (Homerun)
Username: Homerun
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 11:46 am:
      
An excellent and accurate synopsis from Bernhard - to which I would simply add, regarding fast service from silk screeners, that Home Run Software Services, since acquiring Duplication Masters last Spring, has been turning silk screen orders in 24-72 hours on a regular basis. We offer special pricing incentives for our trade partners. Please email or call me for more details. Patrick Brenden, 1-800-951-5858, pbrenden@home-run.com.

 15 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:25:58 PM 
Started by Andrew Host - Last post by Andrew Host
Post from Previous Forum:
===================================
Bernhard Kirschner (Cdroms)
Username: Cdroms
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 8:24 pm:
     
What to do with unwanted recorded discs.

You do not want to throw them in the trash, for ecological and security reasons.

You do not want to shred them as the shreds are sharp and bad for the ecology.

We have found a disc destroyer from Condre that runs the discs between two knurled rollers, (rollers with little points on them), that would make a CD unreadable to anyone without a forensic laboratory and almost unlimited time. It does damage DVDs as well with the data is in the middle, but as they tend to separate under the pressure, it would be very difficult to restore and data from the disc.

Now that your discs are unreadable, contact a friendly replicator who recycles their material, and ask them to take your unreadable discs and you will be doing the right thing by both the environment and ensuring the security of your clients. We have placed a machine in the front of our store, and invite out clients to bring their unwanted CDs to feed into the Condre destroyer, although there has been limited interest.
The Condre is robust, but does have a tendency to feed more than one disc at a time which causes a jam.

 16 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:20:49 PM 
Started by Andrew Host - Last post by Andrew Host
Post from the previous forum:
===========================
Bernhard Kirschner (Cdroms)
Username: Cdroms
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 8:20 pm:
     
Why do I get remove soft spots, or areas that do not print on a Prism printer?

Soft spots are caused by wear or high spots in the rubber base. If the area is too low, the disc yields a bit under the print head and the print head does not make proper contact. We have found that a solution is to place a piece of sticky tape over the low spot, raising it a little.

A high spot also shows itself as a non-print area, but with no shadow. You can normally feel the high spot with your finger , usually caused by perishing of the trays rubber base. Here again a little light rubbing with fine glass paper will do the trick.

 17 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:18:49 PM 
Started by Andrew Host - Last post by Andrew Host
Posts from the previous forum:
==============================
Bernhard Kirschner (Cdroms)
Username: Cdroms
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 8:17 pm:
      
Rimage Prisms Head cleaning

The usual way to clean the scratches or vertical lines that appear in the printing on Rimage Prism printed discs is to run a cleaning pad with solvent under the print head or gently with a cotton bud.

However we have discovered that the print head is very strong material, and the quickest and most effective way to clean the head is to rub it with sandpaper, or rather very fine glass paper.

The technique is to take a simple eraser, like the type used to rub out pencil on paper, cut it to a strip about ¼” or 6mm square by about 2” 50mm long, then wrap some of the glass paper like you are making a wrapping paper around tobacco to make a cigarette. To remove the ribbon, you can cut it, but we just drag it to one side, and then gently polish the print head by inserting the glass paper wrapped rubber under the print head. Rub for a few times, then wipe the area carefully with lint free cloth or paper and isopropyl (alcohol spirits) to remove the loose dust, replace the ribbon, and hopefully you will have a nice dark print without scratch marks.

Of course if your print head is now completely dead, you have rubbed too hard, and if the marks are still there you either did not remove all the dust or did not rub hard enough.

Another tip, dust is the usual reason for dirt getting onto the print head. Ensure that you keep the printer free of dust by keeping it covered. If you do not have a cover, the top of an A4 or 8.5 x11 paper box is not a bad substitute. We had a few transparent plastic covers made so that we can see at a glance how much ribbon is left before starting big jobs.

--------------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 9:04 am:
     
Excellent info Bernard. I wonder how many "repairable" print heads I've thrown out.

 18 
 on: August 04, 2010, 05:16:07 PM 
Started by Andrew Host - Last post by Andrew Host
Following is the discussion from the previous forum:

Ron Opryszek (Failsafe)
Username: Failsafe

Registered: 2-2005
   
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2005 - 6:16 am:
     
I'm looking for recomendations on DVD Analyzers.
----------------------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone

Registered: 5-2005
   
Posted on Saturday, January 14, 2006 - 12:17 am:
     
We have a Mediatechnics CD/DVD analyzer which we are very happy with. They were demonstrating it at MediaTech in Las Vegas in March. I've been keeping in contact with the developer and they will soon be releasing a version of the software that will also analyze blank media. They are also working on software for analyzing dual layer DVDs as well which will likely be offered as an (free or low cost) upgrade which will run on the current equipment. I believe it still sells for around $5K US. It includes a fully functional computer with XP. We use the analyzer computer to drive several printers as well so it's not a bad investment.
----------------------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone

Registered: 5-2005
   
Posted on Saturday, January 14, 2006 - 12:20 am:
      
For clarification on the Mediatechnics analyzer. It will apparently analyze replicated DVD9s (I have never tried this), it's the Dual Layer Recordable DVDs that it does not currently analyze.
----------------------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone

Registered: 5-2005
   
Posted on Saturday, January 14, 2006 - 12:37 am:
     
I am looking for feedback on how other members handle audio CDs. In our operation we originally started with a Mediaform tower duplicator. Mediaform duplicators have the ability to do an audio compare. As far as I know, they are the only manufacturer that offers Audio compare. I have little doubt that that feature has prevented us from producing copes of defective masters. If they didn't compare, we would not proceed. We now have a CD/DVD analyzer which really helps to determine if the master is suitable for duplication. We still do the audio compare to make sure the image on the tower's hard drive is functionally identical to the master. It is now getting to the point where we are in need of a new duplicator. I would like to get some feedback from others who do not use audio compare when duplicating Audio CDs to see how effective it has been. Thanks for all input.
----------------------------------------------------------
Andrew Host (Cdroms2)
Username: Cdroms2

Registered: 1-2005
   
Posted on Monday, January 23, 2006 - 11:31 am: 
   
Our MediaFORM 8 drive robotic duplicator had a software option for vefifying audio, but it always failed verification even though there was absolutely nothing wrong with the disc. Our smaller 3 drive MediaFORM was able to verify audio, but it performed audio verification VERY slowly.
Since moving to Rimage Autostar robotic duplicators, we have had no problem with verification of audio CDs.
Although this may not solve your problem, because as far as I know, the verification is of the copies against the image file. I am reasonably sure that there is no verification of the image file against the original master.
I also agree that an analyzer is an essential tool.

----------------------------------------------------------
Jim McNeil (Canclone)
Username: Canclone

Registered: 5-2005
   
Posted on Saturday, January 28, 2006 - 1:35 am:
      
Thanks for the info Andrew. The Mediaform towers we have are (in theory) able to load an audio image to the hard drive and then do a compare of the stored image back to the original master. It is a very good way to confirm that the image on the drive is functionally identical to the master. As you know, many things can co wrong when loading a master. Virtually all duplicators can compare data images to the master, but audio seems to be an issue. Our towers are getting very old and should be replaced fairly soon. The comparing of the Audio image back to the master I feel is very important. How do duplicators confirm the audio image is identical to the master if they cannot compare them? If they are not compared are you finding significant issues in the duplicates? Of course it would be possible for a incorrect image to be used in a duplication job and the resulting duplicates passing a test or analysis where they could have significant errors on the audio.

Thanks for the input on this important issue.

----------------------------------------------------------
Ron Opryszek (Failsafe)
Username: Failsafe

Registered: 2-2005
   
Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 10:49 pm:
     
Any one have any suggestions for DVD analyzers other than Clover Systems?
----------------------------------------------------------
Ron Opryszek (Failsafe)
Username: Failsafe

Registered: 2-2005
   
Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 11:04 pm:
      
Looking into Mediatechnics, thanks for the input Jim. Anyone else have a product/Manufacturer suggestion?
----------------------------------------------------------
Mark Worthington (Discanalysis)
Username: Discanalysis

Registered: 10-2006
   
Posted on Saturday, October 28, 2006 - 6:41 am: 
   
I build the analyzers for Mediatechnics. We have added ISI and blank scanning. We will run a free test for any IDDA member free of charge.

 19 
 on: August 04, 2010, 04:53:03 PM 
Started by Andrew Host - Last post by Andrew Host
Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2004 - 5:52 pm:      
The Discussion Forum for the IDDA has returned.

Pages: 1 [2]
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!